foxy-voxy:

gothsportscore:

i don’t want to be a part of a college system where plagiarism is a worse crime than rape

When you plagiarize in an academic setting, you’re probably stealing words and ideas from men. This is why it’s a worse crime than rape. Nobody cares about stealing someones dignity, just about men’s intellectual property.

(via ash-and-fire)

Notes
84741
Posted
2 days ago

imsirius:

Daniel Radcliffe at the Irish Premiere of What If

(via ohremus)

Notes
3205
Posted
2 days ago
mussolinguini:

TWO ESCAPED PRISONERS LIMA, OHIO
Left: Clifford Opperud 5’10” 175 lbs on convictions of aggravated robbery, burglary, and kidnapping.
Right: Thomas Michael Lane III (TJ Lane) 5’8” 125 lbs serving life for the fatal shooting at Chardon High School in 2012, killed 3 students, wounded 2
I don’t care where you’re from, PLEASE spread this!!! They’ve been missing since around 8 pm EST

mussolinguini:

TWO ESCAPED PRISONERS
LIMA, OHIO

Left: Clifford Opperud
5’10” 175 lbs
on convictions of aggravated robbery, burglary, and kidnapping.

Right: Thomas Michael Lane III (TJ Lane)
5’8” 125 lbs
serving life for the fatal shooting at Chardon High School in 2012, killed 3 students, wounded 2

I don’t care where you’re from, PLEASE spread this!!! They’ve been missing since around 8 pm EST

(via charleslincolnneal)

Notes
4755
Posted
2 days ago

mllemouse:

I need a large stack of these at times.

(Source: shmegeh, via underhelios)

Notes
228039
Posted
2 days ago

theamazingindi:

tombstone-hero:

Please Share This

Thousands of Tumblr users have been misled by a post suggesting that an unidentified elementary school girl was battered and sexually assaulted by her classmates only to have authorities excuse it as “rough housing”. This story is awful and provokes anger amongst its readers, as it should. However it’s a LIE

This article smelled “off” when I read it because it clearly stated that the mother withheld her daughter’s name to save her from humiliation. Which made the photo of the girl seem off. Why hide her name if you’ll show her face? That’s because this isn’t an article on CNN like the post suggests and that little girl isn’t a sexual assault victim. You’re looking at a photo of Makayla McEvoy. She was 7 when this photo was taken in 2012 after she survived a Kangaroo attack.

Little miss McEvoy is an Australian animal attack survivor. She is NOT an American rape victim from Georgia (thank God)

The artificial news story was fabricated by a Tumblr user called dropmycumberbritches (who now goes by vegetableighs since handing the account off to someone else to avoid heat) After posting the artificial story to raise awareness to Rape Culture, the Tumblr user then celebrated and sang their own praise. Luckily another Tumble user, untrue-posts, found the article, did some digging and reblogged the initial post with the real info.

However, the original post is still picking up speed and is sitting comfortably at 20k+ posts. Please, spread this news and let everyone know that there is not a Georgian rape victim going uncared for. Instead, there’s a poor Australian girl who was attacked by a Kangaroo in 2012 who recovered, only to have her face used for some else’s agenda.

please reblog, several people posted this story and it’s fucking horrible someone would use this as a prop.

(via mcberrysworld)

Notes
16264
Posted
2 days ago
autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

(via dontbeanassbutt)

Notes
49160
Posted
2 days ago

ruffiansonships:

This was the greatest moment ever.

(Source: rubyredwisp, via mcberrysworld)

Notes
172910
Posted
2 days ago

micdotcom:

13 cover girls worth pinning up on your walls

What does real “cover girl” look like? Here are a few women demolishing stereotypes (along with glass ceilings) while gracing magazines across all different kinds of interests and professions. This non-extensive list highlights just a few of the most prominent role models who have beaten the odds to truly represent on America’s newsstand.

See 4 more | Follow micdotcom

(via thatgeeklover)

Notes
2997
Posted
2 days ago

reservoirdoggedness:

Some snippets from all the truth being spoken in the #WhatIsBlackPrivilege hashtag on Twitter right now

(Source: noscrubs-a-dub-dub, via tea-again)

Notes
48224
Posted
2 days ago